3 Things You Should Never, Ever Do After a Job Interview

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    After a job interview, it’s only natural that you want to know where you stand. You spent a lot of time researching the company, preparing your talking points, and choosing what to wear, and you’re pretty sure you nailed it. So why haven’t you heard back? Well, Rome wasn’t built in a day, and companies are sometimes slow to make decisions, and as Daron Pressley writes for a helpful piece on Black Enterprise, you shouldn’t let your eagerness get the better of you and lead you to do something that will kill your chances.

    In “3 Post-Interview Flops That ensure a Lost Job Opportunity,” Pressley gives great advice on things you should NEVER do after an interview. Read on to see his list of no-nos.

    1. Fishing — You might be tempted to call or email a hiring manager and see what’s up, but as Pressley writes, “fishing” of this variety will only make you look bad. Communication of this type can “come off as very invasive and intrusive,” he explains, and that’s hardly the kind of second impression you want to make. “The last thing you want is for a decision maker to feel uncomfortable,” he adds.

    2. Social Commentary — If you think the company has done a really lousy job with the hiring process, that’s an opinion you should most certainly keep to yourself. Don’t get on Facebook and Twitter and tell the world about how this firm and its managers have been unfair to you. “People are connected throughout various industries and organizations,” Pressley explains. “The world is a small place and a potential employer you placed your resumé with may see how you bashed an organization and never give you the chance to interview.”

    3. Lying — By fibbing a bit, you might be able to find out some key information regarding the hiring process, but as Pressley explains, it’s too risky. If you get caught, you’ll miss out on this job and mark yourself foul for future opportunities. “Regardless of how believable a lie might be,” he writes. “It’s just not worth it.”